Actaea tumulosa   Odhner,  1925 (Crab)
Organism information awaits expert curation
Taxonomy
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Arthropoda
Class: Malacostraca
Order:Decapoda
Family:Xanthidae

Image copyrights: Government of India

Description
Size: Width 6.5-7 mm; length 5 mm

A species of small size and rare in availability. Carapace 3/4 as long as wide, rather subcircular in shape, dorsal surface completely well lobulated by deep, distinct, but not quite smooth grooves. The regional lobules on carapace, on antero-lateral sides and on appendages are very convex and studded with distinct pearl-shaped granules. Scattered soft, fine, scanty hairs present all over the body, but more thicker and longer hairs fringed the upper edges of merii of legs. Outer surfaces of hand and wrist bears about five to six lobules. The carpus and propodus of ambulatory legs also bears three, distinct lobules. All these lobules are very convex. Wrists and palms are rather less swollen.

Remarks: Ivory white color, small size, and very convex lobules of carapace, their arrangements and the shape of carapace are quite distinctive in appearance. Pearly granules on the regional lobules are uniform in size and in arrangement. The distinctive textural pattern of the carapace separates the species from its nearest ally. The crab is not very easy to recognize and determine because of its very small size.


Synonym (s)
Actaea tumulosa Odhner, 1925
Paractaea tumulosa Guinot, 1971
Paractaeopsis tumulosus Serene, 1984

Common Name (s)
Economic Importance and Threats

Ecology

Biogeography


• Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Andamans INDIA
• SRI LANKA

Literature Source(s)
  • Deb, M (1989) Contribution to the study of Xanthidae: Actaeinae (Decapoda: Crustacea) of India Records of the Zoological Survey of India. Occasional Paper No. 117 ZSI, Calcutta 59 pp Available at - NIO, Goa
  • Society for the Management of European Biodiversity Data (2009) World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) Available at - http://www.marinespecies.org

Page last updated on:2010-08-17

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